How Eating Breakfast Makes Your Child Smarter

Nutrition after surgery: What you need to know for a speedy recovery

Research has shown that eating breakfast can improve a childs cognitive performance in the classroom, particularly memory and attention span. More interestingly, a study just published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience , explains why and how a morning meal impacts the brain. According to the researchers in this study, children have a higher rate of metabolizing glucose in their brains as compared to adults. Glucose is the fuel that feeds the body. This higher rate of using glucose, coupled with their longer nighttime slumber, puts children at a higher risk for depleting their storage of glucose, called glycogen, in their body overnight. Thus, eating breakfast, or breaking the fast so-to-speak, is physiologically important to provide children with the energy-charged glucose to kick start and fuel their brains. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) , over 40 percent of American children do not eat breakfast on a daily basis. As a parent, providing breakfast isnt an issue. Rather, it’s coming up with breakfast ideas that kids will actually eat that is a hair-pulling challenge. On this front, I solicited advice from my nutrition colleagues who are wizards when it comes to meal ideas. Here are their brain-fueling breakfast suggestions for kids of all ages, including you: Denver Omelet in a Mug Dave Grotto, RDN, busy author and father of two teenage girls, often has less than 5 minutes in the morning to prepare breakfast. He relies on one of his favorite Hungry Girl quick recipes, Denver Omelet in a Mug to serve them a fast and satisfying breakfast. Best of all, cleanup is a cinch.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/health/blog/nutrition/2013/09/how_eating_breakfast_makes_you.html

In these circumstances, its best to experiment to see whats the most palatable. Also, serve small portions throughout the day. Standard portions can seem overwhelming to someone who has to muster the strength just to chew. Other tips to make meals more palatable include marinating meat to improve flavor; adding herbs or spices (if tolerated) to bland foods; incorporating flavored protein powder into whole-food shakes; and trying hard candy, strong chewing gum or lemonade to relieve dry mouth and perk up taste buds.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://tbo.com/health/nutrition-after-surgery-what-you-need-to-know-for-a-speedy-recovery-20130831/

Mental Health Professionals THINK Nutrition Is YOUR Responsibility

Visit the Hill’s booth, and try the pet food vets feed their own pets! Next stop, the Hill’s Science Diet Vets Know Best tour will visit Prince George’s County Fair, the oldest running fair in Maryland featuring fun and festivities for the entire family. From September 5 to 8, pet owners are invited to stop by an interactive veterinary-like clinic to learn about pet nutrition and Science Diet. Visitors can talk with trained representatives about the new Science Diet foods and packaging and will receive mouthwatering samples for both dogs and cats. Plus, the Science Diet team will be handing out coupons for FREE bags of treats and wet food along with collector animal-lover pins. “We’re excited to bring our newly formulated Hill’s Science Diet foods to Prince George’s County Fair,” said Chris Rector, Marketing Director, Hill’s US. “We’re passionate about making sure our products provide the best possible nutrition and look forward to letting pets throughout the Washington, D.C.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://finance.yahoo.com/news/hills-r-science-diet-r-112300657.html

Hill’s(R) Science Diet(R) ‘Vets Know Best’ Tour Gets Tails Wagging at Prince George’s County Fair

But we do have to know when to refer our clients to experts in other fields for evaluation and/or treatment. We must take the whole person into account. Thinking about this from the receiving side of services I am a bit worried. While I do not expect all mental health professionals to be nutrition experts, I would think, no I would hope that professionals had a good handle on nutrition. Especially if they are prescribing me medications that are known for huge weight gain. I know Richard encourages therapy patients to stay emotionally, physically, and spiritually healthy and he understands the balance between the mind and body and not wasting time. SEE: Therapy Revolution: Find Help, Get Better, and Move On Without Wasting Time or Money In the end, our nutrition is our own responsibility even though when I am depressed or in the grasp of a mood swing the last thing Im thinking about is my nutrition. In fact, the food Im eating is most likely feeding and fueling the mood or depression. When I go to my behavioral health care provider, the first things they do is take my vitals, my weight, plus oxygen, blood pressure then type a few things and ask a few more questions. Then I have 15 minutes with my manager who takes up most of the time brow beating me about my weight-gain and I need to lose weight. I even had one doctor pressure me into getting information for by-pass surgery. Then Im maybe given a prescription for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), ricyclics, tetracyclics, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) all with side-effect some weight gain or triggering an insatiable appetite. What I think needs to be done, is the mixing of mental health and nutrition taking the whole person into account as Richard Zwolinski says. Im sure that is available for many with good to moderate insurance, but Im talking about focusing on us financially poor and clinically diagnosed consumers that, like me really have a hard time eating right or lack the knowledge to know how to make a nutritious meal Three Hotdogs with chili cheese and 1/2 Pizza with 2 fries and 4 sodas and box of Nabiscos Nutter Buttersmay not make the list of nutritious meal. Not long ago, that would have been what I ate when I was depressed. The study seems to look at if diets affects mental function and cognitive health. I say, I think so, but I DO KNOW FOR CERTAIN, that once diagnosed your mental health and treatment will affect your weight. Knowing that going into a treatment plan and focusing on nutrition may be what will help speed up your recovery.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://blogs.psychcentral.com/humor/2013/09/mental-health-professionals-think-nutrition-is-your-responsibility/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s