Pregnancy has a more ‘Sacred’ element for New Berlin woman

Coffee, wine and sushi during pregnancy? Go ahead, says new book

“Some of the things will be weird and a little uncomfortable. And that’s OK. Sometimes you have to feel a little uncomfortable in order to grow,” Imig said. And while she said she’s worried people may assume the movement is “too granola,” she explained that it is a good experience for any pregnant woman. “This work, I feel, helps you be a healthy, more peaceful person.
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What I Learned Undercover at a Crisis Pregnancy Center

I think we’ve moved this way over time and in some ways it’s very good, thinking through pregnancy and parenting in a thoughtful and careful way. I think that’s great. But I think there is, sometimes, this kind of shaming aspect to pregnancy. That’s maybe not so productive. RELATED: CAFFEINE LINKED TO LONGER PREGNANCIES, LOWER BIRTH WEIGHTS The editors at Parents.com have already called some of your recommendations flat-out dangerous to pregnant women, particularly your views on alcohol and caffeine consumption. Many of the OBs that I have spoken to and many of the women who I have talked to about the recommendations from their doctors have told me that the doctors say, ‘Yeah, it’s fine to have a couple glasses of wine.’ This is a conversation which will continue to evolve. What were some of the surprises when you started digging into the research?
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/coffee-wine-sushi-pregnancy-new-book-article-1.1430860

The consultation began with the standard questions: name, address, age, date of last period? Right as I began to relax, the Q&A took a turn for the personal and invasive. “What is your relationship with your parents like?” “How is your financial situation?” “Have you told the father?” “What is his religion?” “Are his parents religious?” “How many people have you slept with?” “Would your parents be excited about a grandchild?” As I sat there having my life probed, the purpose of the questions dawned on me. In case the test was positive, my “counselor” wanted to know which tactic to use to persuade me to continue the pregnancy — exactly where my resolve was the weakest.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/caitlin-bancroft/crisis-pregnancy-center_b_3763196.html

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